Tuesday, 30 November 2010

Photo of the Day: Zandra Rhodes & Slendertone


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Slendertone ad featuring a Zandra Rhodes dress. Scanned from Vogue UK, June 1981.


Monday, 29 November 2010

Photo of the Day: Yayoi Kusama


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Yayoi Kusama and followers on top of the Flatiron building, c. 1968. Scanned from Don Snyder's Aquarian Odyssey.


Saturday, 27 November 2010

Photo of the Day: Scherrer 2


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Scherrer 2 perfume ad. Scanned from Vogue UK, May 1988.

I adore that necklace...

Lingerie lovelies, 1967


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Lingerie illustrations from McCall's, 1967. Scanned from Psychedelic Fashions.


Friday, 26 November 2010

Photo of the Day: The Ultimate in Simplicity


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Benny Yong dress photographed by Eric Bohman for Vogue UK, August 1984.

Ignore the white stilettos (and the pearl bracelet, the tights and the earrings), and this outfit is pretty perfect...


Thursday, 25 November 2010

Happy Thanksgiving!


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Gala Mitchell in a chiffon top by Zandra Rhodes and Sylvia Ayton, from the Sunday Times Magazine, 26 June 1968. Scanned from Photographing Fashion.

Happy Thanksgiving to all those in United States!

Wednesday, 24 November 2010

Clothes to Trespass In


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Trespass in herringbone tweed knickerbocker suit and a cape lined in gabardine- with plenty of room in the pockets for oats for casual friends; designed by Tony Armstrong.

An ideal fall wardrobe from The Observer magazine, 10 September 1967. How I would love to be tromping in the countryside in an adorable tartan skirt suit by Foale & Tuffin...

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Trespass in weatherproof Gannex tweed jacket, matching tweed skirt and camel-hair turtleneck jumper; all by Peter Saunders.

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Trespass in misty grey and green tartan suit- just the job for making hay where the sun shines. The jacket is battledress shape, and the skirt has culotte pleats at both front and back; by Foale & Tuffin.

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Trespass in tartan culottes and this Shetland jumper by John Laing.

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Trespass in this trad gabardine raincoat warmed up for treacherous autumn cold snaps with a creamy white Tibetan lamb lining; by Burberry's. Grass-green boucle jersey dress with floppy turtleneck and long bloused sleeves; by Foale & Tuffin.

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Trespass more energetically in this dosgtooth tweed cape worn over a maxi-length culotte, by Mariann McDonnell.


All photos by Barry Lategan for The Observer magazine, 10 September 1967.

Photo of the Day: Biba, 1968


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Barbara Hulanicki for the Biba catalogue, 1968. Scanned from Boutique.

Tuesday, 23 November 2010

Photo of the Day: Madonna, 1985


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Madonna photographed by Bert Stern for Vogue UK, December 1985.


Monday, 22 November 2010

Dream Home: Arizona Lovenest in 'A Star is Born'

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The outside of the Arizona ranch house from A Star is Born.

One of my favourite films is the 1976 remake of Judy Garland's A Star is Born, starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson. While just about everything in the movie is perfect (the clothes, the music, Kris), it is the ranch house John Norman and Esther build in Arizona that makes my heart pound. Simple pueblo style architecture, exposed beams and reclaimed stained glass window skylights are combined into a home that is rustic and homey. Located in the middle of a vast desert, with no life visible on all sides, their love nest is the perfect escape from the intensity of their fame. Decorated with homespun and vintage touches, the look would not be difficult to emulate but it really wouldn't be the same without that view (or that man), right?

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The insanely amazing living room with lofted bedroom (visible in the third image).

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Reclaimed stained glass windows.

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More amazing stained glass in the living room.

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Open fireplace (and Kris!).

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Curving stairs mimicking the topography of the desert, which can be seen from the large picture window.

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Amazing Navajo-style rugs and blankets.

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Swoon worthy stained glass and shirtless Kris Kristoferson.


All screencaps from A Star is Born (1976).

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Photo of the Day: Sarah Moon & Dior


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Sarah Moon, Dior dress portee par Eva votre beauty. Scanned from Photo (France), June 1970.

Sunday, 21 November 2010

Photo of the Day: YSL , 1981


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YSL dress and jacket. Photographed by John Stember for Vogue UK, March 1981.

Now this I wish they had had in the YSL show at the Petit Palace- frothy 80s maximalism at its best.

Saturday, 20 November 2010

Photos of the Day: Bahamas, 1969


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Ali Joint, Bahamas, 1969.

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First Kiss, Bahamas, 1969.

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All photos by Melvin Sokolsky for the New York Times Magazine, 1969.

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Friday, 19 November 2010

Photos of the Day: Kim Basinger in YSL Haute Couture


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Kim Basinger in YSL Haute Couture. Photographed by Herb Ritts for Vogue UK, April 1989.


Thursday, 18 November 2010

Valentino, 1984


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Valentino Spring/Summer 1984 ad campaign. Scanned from Vogue Italia, March 1984.

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Wednesday, 17 November 2010

Photo of the Day: Antonio Berardi's Voodoo


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Antonio Berardi's Voodoo collection, Autumn/Winter 1997. Photographed by Niall McInerney. Scanned from: Fashion at the Edge by Caroline Evans.

Tuesday, 16 November 2010

Photo of the Day: Antony Price Velvet


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Emma Samms in an Antony Price velvet gown. Photo by Andrew Macpherson for Vogue UK, August 1988.

Monday, 15 November 2010

Robert Heinecken's Deconstructive Sexuality

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The cover of Robert Heinecken's 1968 portfolio, Are You Rea.

The works of the American artist Robert Heinecken all fall within the practice of Post-Modernism, and many can be classified as deconstructionist. Starting in the late 1960s, he “produced a series of projects that involved manipulating and recombining media imagery in order to understand how this imagery, chiefly photographic, works on and through our imaginations.”1 He first gained notoriety with his portfolio, Are You Rea, that was published in 1968. Comprised of twenty-five photograms that were exposed to reveal both sides of the source magazine pages at once, Are You Rea “reveals unexpected visual and textual interactions” through bizarre and thought-provoking juxtapositions.2 Seeing himself not as a photographer, but as a ‘paraphotographer’ since his work “stood ‘beside’ or ‘beyond’” traditional photography,3 Heineken was also called a ‘photographist’ by the art critic Arthur Dando in order to “describe the distinction between photographers who make ‘photography as art’ and those concerned with ‘photography in art’.”4

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An image from Are You Rea, 1968.

‘Photographist’ could also be seen as describing his innovative combining of photography and illustration in some of his work. In the series, Cliché-verre/Vary Cliché (1978), Heinecken combined traditional photography with the cliché-verre process, which transfers a drawing on a transparent surface onto light-sensitive paper. Using lost pornographic negatives he collected from photography labs around Los Angeles, the maverick artist would then etch additional elements onto a transparent glass plate that had been coated with an opaque pale-coloured ground.5 He then printed sections of multiple negatives, along with the drawings, into a seemingly random grid, making some images larger than others to create the feeling of motion while also dissecting the overall action into small moments. The body is deconstructed—a face snapped back in ecstasy, a single breast, several inches of a thigh. While the figures in this series are nude and obviously partaking in some form of sexual interaction, his images lack any eroticism. The three images are called Autoeroticism, Fetishism, and Lesbianism, and they individually focus on these three types of sexual experience. Two years previously, he stated, “The most highly developed sensibility I have is sexual, as opposed to intellectual or emotional.”6 Intensely graphic, Heinecken highlights their arousal by toning the lips, of the mouth and vagina, and the nipples with red, yet he also draws on bras and knickers where there were previously none. He also adds in the pelvis in Fetishism, further deconstructing the body by removing the skin and tissue in sections yet leaving it ready for intimacy in other areas.

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Robert Heinecken’s Cliché-verre/Vary Cliché: Autoeroticism, a photo lithograph from 1978.

Heineken’s work all through his career played with ideas of the photographic image, especially in the media. By removing these photographs from their original environment, he is asking the question: what do they say about our culture? Postmodernist in theme, the jagged dislocation of the body in this series is deconstructive yet is also reconstructive through the recombination of parts into a still passionate form. Robert Heinecken found the connection between pornography and fashion of deep interest, wondering why “women are attracted to female poses in fashion magazines that utilize the conventions of pornography”7 and he attempted to combat this through the use of demeaning found pornographic images of women in his work. While his use of this type of image led him to be ostracized by certain sections of the art world, this deconstruction of the female form into highly sellable and exploited parts can be found in both pornographic and fashion magazines today, leaving his work to be seen as a “simple, direct and unlockable doorway into the mass media image world—a world carefully constructed to disguise its inner workings and keep us outside of these workings—on the surface.”8

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Robert Heinecken’s Cliché-verre/Vary Cliché: Fetishism, a photo lithograph from 1978.

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. Robert Heinecken’s Cliché-verre/Vary Cliché: Lesbianism, a photo lithograph from 1978.


1. Rod Slemmons, “Robert Heinecken 1932-2006: Sex and Food, A Memorial Exhibition,” Museum of Contemporary Photography, http://www.mocp.org/exhibitions/2007/01/robert_heinecke.php.
2. Robert Hirsch, Photographic Possibilities:
The Expressive Use of Equipment, Ideas, Materials, and Processes,
(Burlington, MA: Focal Press, 2008), 20.
3. Christopher Knight, “Photographer Robert Heinecken dies”, ZoneZero, http://www.zonezero.com/magazine/obituaries/heinecken/index.html.
4. Hirsch, 20.
5. “Cliché-verre”, JRank: The Arts, http://arts.jrank.org/pages/9550/Clich%C3%A9-verre.html.
6. Colin Westerbeck, “Dancing in the dark: Robert Heinecken's ‘Manifestations of Shiva’”, MARG: A Magazine of the Arts 60, no. 2 (December 2008). Available: http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Dancing+in+the+dark%3A+Robert+Heinecken%27s+%22Manifestations+of+Shiva%22-a0192801351.
7. Slemmons.
8. Ibid.

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