Monday, 28 February 2011

At home with Karl Lagerfeld, 1971


Just in time for Paris fashion week, which starts tomorrow, here are two images from Karl Lagerfeld's apartment from the early 1970s. Always one to go full force with a complete 'look' for his interiors (see his Memphis designed apartment for another example), chrome and mirror were the style of the moment for Lagerfeld in this period.

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French fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld played with a motif of mirrors and metallic paper in the design of his bathroom in Paris. The sumptuously appointed room could be called a "bathing parlor." It includes a sitting area with plastic chairs in red, white, and black encircling a mirror table before the tub. The tub is encased in a sleek mirror frame; the wall above it is made into a counter for bath accessories topped by a large triptych mirror. The dressing cabinet is recessed in a closet- and on the closet door is a full-length mirror. Posters mounted on silver backgrounds set up added instances of sheen and sparkle.



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Adjoining the bathing parlor is Lagerfeld's unusual bedroom. The room is a superslick gym with the bed resting on a platform of stainless steel. Bookshelves are balanced on one wall by the exercising bar. Together they form a continuous motif taking up one entire wall. Scattered about the room are all sorts of exercise equipment, a stationary bicycle, barbells, et al. The designer also throws in examples of Art Deco (the darling of underground collectors) into the scheme: the beige rug, bed pillows, and bed trow. Lamps are hidden by a free-form white plastic screen in the corner, casting shadows on the ceiling.



Text by Norma Skurka with photographs by Oberto Gil for Underground Interiors, 1972.

Photo of the Day: Revlon, 1971


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Revlon ad. Scanned from Vogue UK, September 1971.

Sunday, 27 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Anjelica in Zandra, 1971


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Anjelica Huston in Zandra Rhodes, shot by David Bailey for Vogue UK, September 1971.


Saturday, 26 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Bob Mackie, 1988


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Bob Mackie beaded bandana and sequin dress. Photographed by Steven Klein for Vogue UK, December 1988.

Friday, 25 February 2011

Eye Candy: Helmut Berger, 1971


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Helmut Berger by David Bailey for Vogue UK, April 1971.

Helmut Berger, the Austrian star of some of Luchino Visconti's finest films (such as The Damned), can be seen here as the ultimate in 1970s manhood. Though he was Visconti's lover for a time, Berger appears incredibly masculine here, even in outfits that would appear quite fey on most men. Looking at these images has made me decide to add something to my checklist for all future boyfriends: Must be able to carry off a sapphire moiré taffeta suit.

And to prove how perfectly beautiful he was, below is a clip from Dorian Gray, the 1970 Italian film (dubbed here into Italian) that updated Oscar Wilde's classic novel to sexually and morally loose 1970s London.


Photos of the Day: Wooly Ideas


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"Wooly Ideas" by Barry Lategan for Vogue UK, September 1971.

Back to freezing cold, wet New York, where the initial impulse is to curl up in layers of black cashmere, though I think we would all be much happier here if we took more style cues from the colourful mishmash of patterns and textures shown in this editorial.

Thursday, 24 February 2011

Boucheron, 1969

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Boucheron advertisement. From L'Officiel, #565-566, 1969.

Wednesday, 23 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Redhead Maiden

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Photo by Barry Lategan from Vogue UK, March 1970.

Tuesday, 22 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Ingrid Boulting, c. 1974

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Ingrid Boulting, by an unknown photographer, c. 1974. Scanned from Unseen Vogue.

Monday, 21 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Feathered Dawn

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Photo by David Schoen for Vogue UK, April 1970.

Sunday, 20 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Ozbek Modern Oriental, 1989

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Rifat Ozbek bikini top and bolero. Photographed by Steven Klein for Vogue UK, January 1989.

Saturday, 19 February 2011

Three Shorts Stories: Jerry Hall, 1977

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Jerry Hall and unknown model. Photographed by Jean-Claude Dubois for Harper's & Queen, March 1977.

Friday, 18 February 2011

The New Sea Shape

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Photos by David Schoen for Vogue UK, April 1970.

Thursday, 17 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Beauty Beach

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Photo by Ellen von Unwerth for Vogue, July 1993.

As you read this I will be on a plane bound for a weekend getaway in Belize. I am going with four of my oldest friends- after spending our crazily fun teenage years together in London we are now scattered all over the globe, so this will be a very welcome reunion, especially as one of my friends has just spent the last six months in Afghanistan and is now safely home. I'm looking forward to the sun and swimming, but mostly to just relaxing and having fun with my friends. It will be quite a change from dreary, snowy New York, but since all of you can't also make an escape to Central America, I have scheduled a series of tropical-infused posts for the days while I am away. Make yourself a piña colada and enjoy!

Wednesday, 16 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Jerry & Iman

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Jerry Hall & Iman, 1988.

Tuesday, 15 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Wella, 1976

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Wella hair colour ad. Scanned from Harper's & Queen, October 1976.

Monday, 14 February 2011

Dream Home: Max Gordon in Belgrave Square

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Max Gordon in his study sitting in a Scarpa leather chair, in front of a painting by American realist Alan Turner; this, of an archetypal director and his chauffeur, was once intended to hang in Hill Samuel's entrance hall, for a double take.

The Belgrave Square flat of the architect Max Gordon (most well-known now for designing New Scotland Yard) can be seen here, photographed by Tim Street-Porter for British Vogue, September 15 1971. Calling his style "more Boeing than Bauhaus," the space is glossy and neutral with colour and dynamism provided by his impressive modern art collection- the article states he also owns major works by David Hockney, Jim Dine, Ed Ruscha, Lee Bontecou and Richard Smith. In the 1980s, Gordon set up his own consulting firm specifically working on the display of artworks in metropolitan spaces and became the "architect of choice for museums, dealers' galleries and private collectors from Los Angeles, Chicago and New York to London, Madrid, Athens and Helsinki"(NY Times, "Max Gordon, an Architect, 59; Known for His Exhibition Spaces", August 27, 1990). His interest in designing spaces that served as proper frames for modern art can be seen here, as the sleek lines and minimal furniture provide a backdrop to the sculptures and paintings, making this apartment more of a living gallery than a home.


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Dining area, top: Philip King's Small Sculpture, screen wall with light track for spots with dimmer controls. Living area, below: Vertical blinds screening windows, painting above the sofa Stephen Buckley's Fresh End, between the windows Ian Stephenson's Guistichrome. Asprey's upholstered furniture covered in handwoven Moroccan wool originally meant for the L.B. Johnson Library in Texas. Mies van der Rohe stool and table with Christopher Sanderson's Millington III. Modern Tunisian rug and a Ficus Elata almost touching the ceiling.

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The kitchen, space for small dining table and chairs, matte sand colour walls, carpet all over with rubber overlays near stove and sink. The wall relief, Stephen Buckley's Hoch, the sculpture, Matt Rugg's Smokestack.

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View through from the study to the dining and living areas. Transcriptor turntable and stereo headphones on black wood table on Moroccan wool rug, Scarpa leather chairs. Sliding doors have disappeared behind the books, against the wall Stephen Buckley's semi-circular waxed canvas Tarantaraa.

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The bathroom painted brilliant glossy red marine Polyurethane, translucent white plastic ceiling, lights above that. Through the door, the equally scarlet shower, raised up, then the cool beige bedroom.

Photo of the Day: The New Madonna

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Madonna. Photographed by Herb Ritts for Vogue UK, February 1989.

Sunday, 13 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Blue Gods

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Photo by Francesco Scavullo for Vogue UK, June 1970.

Saturday, 12 February 2011

The Janus Face of Spring by Erté

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"Erté is Romain de Tirtoff, his initials making his pen-name. Born in St Petersburg in 1892, his eye for line and colour continues to reflect his Tartar origins, the same oriental inspiration that worked for Bakst and Diaghilev. His firt theatre designs were made in 1913 under the guidance of Paul Poiret, his latest for Expo '67, and he is now at work on a ballet for American television."

Erté and Vogue's view of the new make-up for spring 1969. Vogue UK, February 1969.

Friday, 11 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Veruschka at The Greenhouse

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Veruschka at The Greenhouse, Arlington, Texas. Photographed by Bert Stern for Vogue UK, January 1971.

Thursday, 10 February 2011

Photo of the Day: A Midsummer Night's Dream

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Duane Michals, A Midsummer Night's Dream, for Avenue June/ July 1980. Clothes by Ralph Luren, Issey Miyake, Ted Lapidus and Giorgio Armani.

Wednesday, 9 February 2011

Photo of the Day: Silvathins

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Silvathins ad. Scanned from Vogue UK, February 1971.

Tuesday, 8 February 2011

Journey to Avebury


Derek Jarman, Journey to Avebury, 1971.

When I was eleven we took a class trip to see pre-Roman archeological sites in Wiltshire. While Stonehenge was very impressive, it was at Avebury stone circle that I felt an immediate connection with my surroundings, which I've come to realise is the closest to a spiritual Other that I have ever encountered. The semi-constant appearance of the monoliths at Avebury in my dreams has precipitated a waking interest in reading the histories of Druidic Britain, academic or not. The best of these is by far The Modern Antiquarian, written by my favourite man ever (sorry Bryan Ferry!), the Arch Druid himself, Julian Cope. One of my goals in life, on the proverbial 'Bucket List,' is to take a road trip around all of the neolithic sites documented in the book, and possibly many of the ones mentioned in his study of continental European prehistoric monuments, The Megalithic European. These current musings were instigated by uncovering this Super 8 film by Derek Jarman on YouTube yesterday, which I think, in some way, captures the inherent beauty and mysticism of the site.

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David Noton, Dawn amongst the ancient stone circle at Avebury, Wiltshire, England, 2009.

Photo of the Day: Let it happen to you...

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Imprévu by Coty ad. Scanned from Vogue UK, October 1970.

Monday, 7 February 2011

Dream Home: At Home with Derek Jarman

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Anyone who has seen any of Derek Jarman's films knows what a visual treat they are, so it is really no surprise that his wharf-side home in the 1970s is such an innovative and impactful space. An early settler in the Docklands, Jarman's loft was an old grain warehouse. Though he moved out prior to the arrival of the wrecking balls that spelled the demise of the working docks, he made quite a few Super 8 videos of the area in the 70s, which were on view at the Serpentine Gallery exhibition of his work in 2008.


The huge city loft offers fabulous living quarters quite unlike those of any other metropolitan dwelling. The occupant generally inherits time-scarred beams overhead, wide planks on the floors, high, handsome windows with a view of the city, and incredible spaciousness. Scenographer Derek Jarman lives in this loft in London. It is as full of character as a 200-year-old converted barn in the country. In the major living space Jarman has created a raised platform upon which the furniture sits. Tables and the bed-cum-sofa are low, heightening the room's sense of vast, horizontal space. To city dwellers. so used to small cramped rooms, tiny staircases, and vertical space distribution, the loft seems a vision-come-true of almost more space than can filled. Jarman fills the spacious whitewashed rooms with furnishings that not quite antiques, hammocks, large contemporary canvases, and a variety of primitive-looking objects.



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Text by Norma Skurka with photographs by Oberto Gil for Underground Interiors, 1972.

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